The COD2 MVP at The GO Malta eSports Festival 2017

The GO Malta eSports Festival 2017 was the second time which we included COD2 last year; and competition grew substantially between teams and individuals really brought it this time round. Arguably, the title was the highlight of the competition due to Ephica's first place finish over Paradigm6.Thus, among the many incredible performances, we've decided to crown an MVP, paying him the respects he deserves as a player. Without further delay, below are the promising nominees. 

Nomination #1 - Jean Paul "Speeechless" Debono

Kicking off the list with a bang; we've got one of the scopers around. At the MESF 2017, you did not want be in this man's reticle. His skill with the rifle shone exceptionally on the maps Burgundy and Toujane, the opposing team being helpless whether they change up tactics or not. Yet,  "Speechless" had his best moments in the grand final. Here, as cool as a cucumber, he clutched up against some harsh odds in the SnD and was ultimately, pivotal to Ephica's overall success. 

Nomination #2 - George "Kempes" Meilaq

The only mger on this list, and the best on the whole island, is  Goerge "Kempes" Meilaq ands for good reason. Having an uncanny ability to shift seamlessly to opposing enemy pushes, speeding up and slowing down when necessary to put himself in the optimal position for gunfights. Definitely dOUBTFUL's best player in many situations, being the top fragger in each map almost every time. Without him, the team wouldn't have been able to reach the final loser bracket. 

Nomination #3 - Jeffrey "Jeff" Spiteri 

Another scoper, this time from rival Paradigm6, is also a persuasive contender for MVP. Insane; the only word which may captivate his scoping skills. Regularly picking off one or two players, giving his team the first blood and thus the advantage in SnD. Constantly pulling a neutral look, pressure simply doesn't effect him and his team always looks towards him for team players and proper decisions; essential to the structure of Paradigm6. 

Nomination #4 - Cyril "Vortex" Coppini

Whether he's using an mg, scope, rifle or even a damn shotgun, "Vortex" always managed to pull off a wonderful performance as an individual on the victorious side of Ephica. Some may refer to him as the team carry, without much resistance. Such claims are fueled by his addiction to having the most frags and trying new things to stun the enemy team. His flexibility with weapons surprised his opponents and let his teammates use their preferred weapons: it doesn't seem to make a difference to him. During the final is where he especially shone, helping ensure a win over Paradigm6. 

Nomination #5 - Nigel "Najju" Vella

Fighting for the side of Heq Gaming; it's safe to say that "Najju" is the most underrated player on this roster of nominees. Finishing just shy of the podium, the player did everything he could to carry his side having a constant 25 to 30 frags per game against the toughest opposition. Although it wasn't enough, Gamers.com.mt recognises his humungous efforts and that's why he's a potential MVP for the MESF COD2 tournament. "Najju" has the potential to do so much more on a better team. 

Nomination #6 - Daniel "sou1ex" Cassar 

Probably one of the largest upsets at the event for Paradigm6 was the hardware issue they encountered as "sou1ex" allegedly had mouse issues in the grand final. Perhaps the outcome of the tournament would have been different had it not occured. Nonetheless, the player had a fantastic event, having an affinity for the map Toujane as his opponents learned the hard way. His scope and rifle shot was pristine and he made some huge plays to make his way onto our list. 

THE MVP

The list is complete and we're ready to spill the beans on who is our chosen player. Much arguing and debating among the Gamers.com.mt staff has finalised that Cyril "Vortex" Coppini is the MVP of the GO MESF 2017 COD2 Tournament. His dedication to his team and his own gunskill lead to an outstanding performance at the event, allowing Ephica to win and sparking this rivalry between themselves and Paradigm6. 

We look forward to seeing these teams adapt to upcoming games such as Battalion 1944. The title makes no difference since competition knows no boundaries. 

Posted by Gabriel Sciberras on 14th January 2018, 11:18

I'm Gabriel - 17 year-old student attending a sixth form with a little free time on his hands. I've been working with Gamers.com.mt for a roughly a year now - spreading my interests in technology, gaming and writing over the platform along with interviews and hardware reviews. All constructive feedback is appreciated. Thanks for reading!

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