COD:WWII In Malta : Project Eversio Interview

Following the discursive article that was written regarding the current state of the COD:WWII community, speculating about its future and potential, there was this voice at the back of my head which screamed for a second opinion. With that being said, we turned to Project Eversio for our third interview with the organisation. This interview was carried out in response to the aforementioned article, which one may revisit here. Before continuing with the interview, it's recommended you catch up if you haven't. Without further delay, let's see what Project Eversio thought of our questions. 

It’s great to be interviewing you again. Let’s start with some history; would you be able to briefly recount Project Eversio’s past affiliated with the local Call of Duty scene?

Project Eversio actually started off as a Call of Duty 2 (PC) team back in 2007 when competition was fiercest. Our debut LAN was ClubLAN'07, in which we competed as a 'mixed team' together with members from another well-decorated team in Malta: SAS Gaming. We placed 4th after losing to dOUBTFUL. We attended a second LAN event with our full lineup the following month, and we placed 3rd, losing 18-21 to eXosphere. A few months after that, Call of Duty 4 was released, and we immediately shifted to the new title.

The three years that we spent actively competing in CoD4 were the defining years of the organisation, as not only did we become the dominant force in the local scene, but we also became well known in the international CoD4 scene. Locally, we maintained our perfect track record, winning 11 LAN events out of 11, not to mention numerous local cups. Internationally, we had the opportunity to play against the top European teams on a daily basis, we were invited into international cups, including Clanbase's prestigious EuroCup, and we had the amazing opportunity to compete at The eXperience 2009 in Denmark, together with all the top teams of the international CoD4 scene, during its peak as a competitive title.

As the local and international scenes wound down, so did our competitive drive in CoD4. We competed in local tournaments till the very last one, which was held during the Malta eSports Festival 2013 at the Centenary Stadium in Ta' Qali, which we also won, and since then all of our players have moved on to other titles, and the core of the team still plays together in different titles occasionally.

Since late last year' we entered into the realm of console Call of Duty - a completely different scene to be honest, but a larger one than most PC-oriented esports fans can imagine - even locally. We were approached by Randu, who set up our current team, but who left to pursue other opportunities after a while. Unfortunately I don't see the same competitive spirit in the local console scene as we had back in the day, possibly due to lack of frequent tournaments for the game, or the lack of serious competitive teams, yet we're very happy to be supporting the local champions, and help them out in their esports endeavours.

What are your comments regarding the community’s past three years? What went wrong and why did the local scene depreciate? What was your reaction to the reveal of COD:WWII?

With the demise of Call of Duty 4 around 2011, the competitive community for Call of Duty on the PC has never been the same. Although there were still a few avid teams around, particularly in Call of Duty 2, it was a far cry from the days of SPEED-LINK, TEK-9 and Serious Gaming in CoD2, or the days of Fnatic, Dignitas and eSuba in CoD4. The local scene mirrored those deveopments to a certain extent, though classic CoD2 still remained a favourite amongst a core, close-knit part of the community. With that said, CoD2 wasn't a growing community, which is why I think everyone was looking forward to trying out a new game. Counter-Strike Global Offensive was too different, and perhaps a bit too punishing as a competitive title compared to CoD, and people quickly jumped over to the next game in line: Overwatch, which unfortunately however couldn't attract the interest of sufficient local players for enough time. Very few people from the competitive PC community held high hopes for CoD:WWII - despite the initial hype of going back to the roots. The lack of adequate competitive support on the PC means, including a competitive mode, dedicated servers etc meant most people didn't even give it a try.

On the console side of things, it was pretty different. The sci-fi element of the CoD franchise following CoD:MW3 and Black Ops 3 just couldn't retain the interest of players for long, despite the popularity of the titles. Whilst there are indeed some hardcore competitive players on console, the majority of the community does not have the same hardcore competitive pedigree as its PC counterpart. This is partly fueled because of the lack of competitive events for Maltese players both online and offline - unfortunately the competitive console scene hasn't had the same - but hopefully we'll ge there soon. CoD:WW2 generated a lot of hype amongst the community, though having only four teams turn up for MESF 2017 was quite disheartening, I hope organisers will try to uplift this untapped market with grassroots initiatives such as one night cups etc to create a healthy competitive scene.

On the day of Call of Duty: WWII’s release, you announced a new roster specifically for the game. What were you motives for creating the roster and what are your plans for the coming year?

We had been looking at the local console competitive community for a while, and CoD:WW2 presented the perfect oppotunity for a clean start 'with a bang'. We had been in discussions with Randu, who would eventually become our team leader for several months in anticipation of launch, so we had a solid plan going into the game. Our ethos is to push Maltese talent in esports to an international standard. Considering the esports profile that CoD:WW2 presented, and its potential, we were very happy with the opportunity to partner up with our present roster of talented players.

At this stage, our plan is to keep the team stable and motivated, and we look forward to any local competitions on the horizon.

 Just a week before the MESF 2017 COD: WWII, you were hit with a roster change – yet still managing to find victory anyway. Describe what occurred and how you managed to maintain focus during this period of time.

It was quite a shock to tell you the truth. The lineup for the squad had been in place for months before the release of CoD:WW2, we had the tickets for the event in hand, and we were really looking forward to the debut of our squad at MESF, especially since we already had to cancel participation in the Quickfire Nova Series event due to the fact that not enough teams signed up. Unfortunately there was a disagreement between the players and the team's captain, and the latter eventually opted to pursue opportunities with international teams. We were actually read to cancel our participation in MESF, but at the last moment we found Owen "Owages" Agius as a stand-in, which turned out great, as it not only allowed us to compete, but he also turned out to be an excellent player. Notwithstanding the departure of their captain, I think the team knew that they still had an excellent opportunity to win the event. Their performance in international tournaments leading up to MESF had been outstanding, and they knew it would have been a pity if they didn't at least given it a shot - ultimately they were rewarded, as they received their first on-stage competitive experience, and first place in the tournament.

You won the MESF 2017 quite decisively. Who are your most threatening local rivals at the moment in the scene? What plans do you have, if any, for international competition?

4 Man Army turned out to be the main competition during the event, and to tell you the truth, it wasn't as decisive as the scoreboard might tell you. The matches were all very close, each victory and defeat hardly fought, and a thrill to watch. Props to them for a great performance.

At this stage, there are no plans for international competition, as some of our players are focusing on exams.

The final question. Having read our discursive article; do you agree or disagree with anything that was said? Is there anything you’d like to add?

I don't believe the CoD franchise on PC will ever have the same competitive following as it had during the days of Call of Duty 1, 2 and 4, both locally and internationally. Battalion 1944 does capture some of the same competitive spirit of those titles, yet it's very hard to imagine Battalion ever being anywhere close to the international esports titles such as League of Legends, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive or Dota 2. The game doesn't have the backing of a mammoth game developer, so it will be hard to have the same amount of funding and exposure as other titles. Nonetheless, I do believe it can manage to get a decent competitive community running, both and abroad, and especially locally - so we are very much looking forward to what Battalion will bring in the very near future.

With respect to CoD:WW2 on consoles, four teams for MESF was quite disheartening. We know that there are many more local players for the game, which hopefully can be converted into being part of the competitive community. The game does indeed have potential here, and hopefully, organisers can give it more attention by trying to build the scene from its roots, as aforementioned, by creating one night cups or leagues online, and having more tournaments in summer, which would allow the younger players to participate.

Unfortunately, however, I don't see the commingling of competitive players on different platforms to happen. Keyboard and mouse is completely different to console controllers, as is the playstyle - and I do believe that both communities can remain healthy whilst developing in parallel.

Thank you so much once again for providing us and the whole community with insight regarding the local esports industry. Such content is pivotal to the progression and improvement of it on the whole and we couldn’t thank you more. We wish you the very best for the coming year!

Again, Project Eversio pleases with some incredibly in-depth answers. As we stated in the final message, Gamers.com.mt wishes Project Eversio the very best for the coming year!

Posted by Gabriel Sciberras on 8th February 2018, 09:13

I'm Gabriel - 17 year-old student attending a sixth form with a little free time on his hands. I've been working with Gamers.com.mt for a roughly a year now - spreading my interests in technology, gaming and writing over the platform along with interviews and hardware reviews. All constructive feedback is appreciated. Thanks for reading!

Comments

Our Social Media

Latest News

Apex Legends at the Malta Cyber Series#5: MRO Edition

It was bound to occur; the arrival of a free-to-play battle-royale which would contest with the juggernaut of Fortnite in both spectra of competitive and casual play. It goes without saying, that I'm referring EA's Apex Legends; an engaging mix of pick-a-hero gameplay and other unique mechanics tossed into the recipe of battle-royale. The title has definitely taken the world, and the country by storm; we've realised this. Hence, GMR Entertainment will be capitalizing on the current buzz by offering competitive Apex Legends at our upcoming event; the MCS#5: MRO Edition.  The MRO, year in and year out, has always been an opportunity to dig our heels into the ground and push forward with a new titles such as Overwatch, Battalion 1944 and now, Apex Legends. The announcement is probably less of a surprise to most of you, especially those who tuned in to last week's stream hosted by the new Hex Media studio, where we revealed our intentions through a little gameplay of our own. For the tournament; one can expect a format similar to the one utilized by the international Twitch Rivals event: in which teams attempted to score as many points as possible overall through placement and kills. The Apex Legends tournament will be part of the BYOC area, which is a new addition for the first time in the MRO series.  With new legends, updates, ideas and tonnes of support from social media and communities, Apex Legends is definitely the 'next big thing' in gaming. However, the cyclic nature of these free battle-royale titles will only become more rapid as developers cram for the spotlight - though, if they keep these titles free and accessible to the community, it's only beneficial to the community. The only drawback, is that the contemporary nature of these battle-royale games, and the fact that attention is being pulled in many directions, makes sustaining a long-lasting and stable esport quite difficult.

Angelo Vella at the Red Bull MEO Clash Royale Finals

Ever since winning the Maltese Red Bull MEO Clash Royale Finals and the Qlash Clash Royale Tournament hosted at the Malta Esports Festival 2018, GMR Entertainment has been keeping a close eye on the champion; Angelo anglu Vella. Such attention led up to the fact after he had qualified for the international Red Bull MEO Clash Royale Finals - where he would represent Malta in an international competition, stacking ambassadors from each country across the mobile title of Clash Royale. Apart from the event itself acting as quite the breakthrough for mobile-gaming in general, it was an opportunity for Angelo to show his stock.  The international event, involving a total of 36 countries, had been building up ever since September of last year, with qualifiers gradually concluding in each respective country within every continent. With the event including the other titles of 'Arena of Valor' and 'Brawl Stars', the venue was certainly buzzing with excitement, but also tension - $50,000 were on the line on the whole. This mentality was embraced immediately, and it seems that Angelo anglu Vella found himself in quite a tough spot within Group D. Competing against players from America, Mexico, Turkey, Portugal, Greece, Brazil and Egypt, the Maltese competitor would undoubtedly struggle. Anglu tied points with Greece and Turkey, but due to score difference he was placed 7th out of 8 within groups - ending his tournament there. "The Ice" (BR) Vs "Anglu" 3:2 "Sergioramos" (MX) Vs "Anglu" 3:0 "iForg1ven" (GR) Vs "Anglu" 3:1 "lelouch" (TR) Vs "Anglu" 2:3 🏆 "UnstoppableCR" (US) Vs "Anglu" 3:0 "The Awesome" (EG) Vs "Anglu" 0:3 🏆 "RafinhaJr11" (PT) Vs "Anglu" 3:1 Nonetheless, we're very proud of Angelo and we encourage him to continue pursuing this notion of competition - you're only 18 and a plethora of future opportunities will arise; keep striving to compete with others and yourself most of all.  The rest of the event concluded smoothly with ThunderStruck from UK being crowned as winner, though we will admit that our peak interest was in the performance of our representative Angelo Vella. One interesting fact is one pertaining to cheating - the French player GregEmpire77, as reported by Dotesports, was competing against a German player within the play-offs, when he was accused of communicating to his manager during the game. He pleaded guilty to the accusation, showing off the AirPods he had snuck underneath his headset, through which his coach communicated to him, selling the lie that all was legal. He was quickly disqualified. With this event being a major primary step in mobile gaming and to witness cheating early on - is the accessibility of mobile phones, leading to a higher susceptibility of cheating, going to be a detriment to future mobile esports?  To conclude, we'd like to congratulate Angelo for participating, flying out to an international event and gaining the experience which we wish for him to use to push forward in the scene. Also, we've managed to gain further insight into the mobile esports scene - how long will it take before we start seeing major and headlining events based on a mobile platform?

CWL Pro League 2019 Preview

With the end of last, the divisions for the 2019 CWL Pro League were concluded through the Pro League Qualifier event. A total of 16 spots were up for grabs; four of which had already been awarded to the likes of Optic Gaming, Luminosity, eUnited and Splyce following a satisfactory Top 4 finish at the first event of the year; CWL Vegas.  The PQL offered some potential shock, as certain 'top teams' began questioning the notion of the 'favourite'; with the lesser known teams snatching a series now and then. A few teams that many thought wouldn't make it were Red Reserve, Team Envy, and of course, the notoriously problematic squad of 100Thieves. Luckily for them, they all managed to make it through; avoiding communal tension and the subconscious screams for a roster change, at least for now. However, one top name did fail to qualify - FaZe Clan. The squad of 'Replays', 'Attach', 'Zooma', 'Priestahh' and the newly added young talent of 'Cellium'; who I personally believed performed very well overall, were kicked out by Excelerate Gaming in the Losers' Bracket. Perhaps this proves that former player Methodz was not completely culpable for their similarly poor performance at CWL Vegas. With the current state of other teams in mind, such as 100T, and the fact that FaZe is one of the top organizations within the Call of Duty scene; I find that a roster change is on the horizon - the players, especially Zooma and Attach, are undoubtedly disappointed in not qualifying for the esteemed league.  Another team to also fail their expectations, albeit lower than others, was G2 Esports, captained by Parasite, the BO2 champion. Unluckily for them, they matched up against a desperate Red Reserve - the game between them determined with who would progress and who would go home from the two of them. All live viewers were gifted with a 5 map series, terminated with a Round 11 SnD - Methodz was left alone in a 1v3; it really has been a tough year for the former member of the event-winning Rise Nation of WWII.  Anyways, the divisions have been concluded, with the 16 teams grouped up as follows;  The open bracket teams of Midnight, Evil Geniuses, Enigma6 and Team Envy all came out swinging and quickly solidified a spot into the Pro League. Some new names, such as Heretics and Team Space act as undetermined threats to the top tier teams.  Looking over the divisions as a whole, both are rather stacked; the exact aim of the Pro League.  While Division A houses the top-dogs of Optic and Luminosity; it's unsure how these teams will fare against other teams that, although on paper have less stock, have made use of a tremendous amount of practice this past week in qualifying. Personally, I find that Division B is slightly more competitive, with the bottom four splitting hairs, Enigma6 and Envy lacking consistency while eUnited and Splyce juggle for dominance. However, it is imperative to keep in mind the fact that unlike last year's league, teams in different divisions will have the opportunity to play one another this year. With schedules and specific matchups to be released, it'll be curious to witness how these cross-division matches play out.  With $700,000 on the line, the first week kicks off with the 4th of February. All the action will climax with the awaited play-offs. Until then, many teams such as FaZe Clan await impending departures of professional players who wish to compete in the Pro League, to give an example of such a team. A similar situation is being faced by G2 Esports and Team Sween, to note.   The newly updated season of Trading Shots, hosted by CWL, will be sure to break down all of the latest news - personally a massive fan since its introduction last year. 

Red Bull M.E.O. by ESL – World Finals will take place in Germany

Following their motto “Open to All! Won by One” Red Bull and ESL will bring one of the world’s largest mobile esports tournaments to Germany. The World Finals of the global tournament series Red Bull M.E.O by ESL (Mobile Esports Open) will take place from 1-3 February 2019 in the Warsteiner Music Hall in Dortmund. The German offline finals of Red Bull M.E.O. will take place on 1st of February. The winners will directly qualify for the World Finals, taking place on 2nd-3rd February, where they will face the best mobile gamers from 36 nations. Apart from Germany, mobile gamers from France, Japan, USA, Brazil, South Africa and many more will meet on stage. In Germany, they will fight for top positions in the mobile hits Clash Royale and Arena of Valor, as well as the brand-new arena shooter Brawl Stars. However, Red Bull M.E.O. by ESL is not an ordinary tournament: it’s open to all ambitious mobile gamers! Matches in the strategy game Clash Royale will be fought between individual players, while the MOBA hit Arena of Valor will set teams of five against each other. Worldwide qualifiers for both titles began in September and ran throughout December. German gamers will also get their chance at a place in the finals: by taking part in online preliminaries, they can qualify for the German Offline Final on 1st of February. Three more qualifiers will take place on the official ESL tournament page with the last one to be held on the 25th of January. Meanwhile, a total of 22 international Brawl Stars teams of influencers and gamers battled it out on the 6th of January to qualify for the World Finals in Germany. Eight teams fought their way through the different game modes and earned a spot for the World Finals with American influencer ‘Ash’ winning the qualifier competition. Tickets for the event are free and limited so make sure to get a seat as soon as possible. As well as two days of pure mobile gaming, there will be many more activities in the arena to make your weekend a true success — including a Brawl Stars free-to-play area and some activities at the Media Markt and Vodafone booths. In addition to that there will be an aftershow party for all visitors on Saturday directly after the live show. Up to 1,000 live visitors are expected for the World Finals of Red Bull M.E.O. in Dortmund. Additionally, the tournament will be broadcast live in English and other languages via livestream. More information on Red Bull M.E.O. by ESL is available on the official homepage.

Hex Media Studio Unveiled - A Local Professional Studio

Anyone who's been keeping up with our social media is probably aware of a new professional content studio on the island; that of Hex Media, a new venture betweeen the Maltese 3D Printing Company, Invent3D and GMR Entertainment. Located within the heart of Zabbar, the studio, prior to even officially opening, has already landed the sponsorship of AOC Gaming, providing some excellent panels, GT Omega Racing, offering some top-notch seating and Trust Gaming granted the centre the peripherals it needs. Not to forget, Red Bull is also on tap for the expanding team behind the project. Speaking of which, the team, hosted a live stream through one of the team member's Twitch channels in NGEN15 and William Cachia (co-host of Game Defined) late on the 11th January, which we shared on social media. The stream consisted of continuous PC building with the team breaking down their future prospects for the project, explaining what it will have to offer once it's officially open. With so much to reveal and PCs to build, it's no wonder that the stream was animated for over 3 hours.  The Hex Media studio looks to be a stand-out centre in Malta, a studio to both entertain and involve the Maltese community in general - not just gamers, but also aspiring content creators such as streamers, podcasters, casters and editors or tournament organizers like ourselves. This is due to the ability to train potential talent in the various area of casting, video editing and production together with online streaming media for both amateurs and also students, especially those who cannot afford their own resources or software, as apart from the software, the studio is decked out with top-of-the-line equipment for audio and visuals. With that being said, consumers may also rent hardware of this type should they choose to do so. Other services include product photography, graphic design, catering for esport team merchandise and media through flexible packages, rendering services and various forms of consultation in tournament casting, production and support in general. Consultation varies from serious business inquiries to something as simple as helping with personalised PC construction, similar, in this way, to the Gamers Lounge. Overall, flexibility and accessibility is something that Hex Media is clearly embracing, thanks to a varied spectrum of talent across a dedicated and friendly team. GMR Entertainment looks forward to using the high-quality services to generate video content for you all to enjoy, host international event casting and possibly video hardware reviews. With the final pieces being put together, 2019's looking great for Hex Media as they prepare to open their doors. Although the venture is between us two, the studio is open to everyone to use its service. They've also hinted at a possible open day once the floodgates of business are opened, allowing everyone and anyone to come to take a look; perhaps even stretching those PCs with some proper gaming. Keep up to date with their progress through their Facebook page here.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies - hide message